Category Archives: Turf Management

Turf Management and the letter Q!

Can’t think of much starting with the letter Q in turf management, well here’s a few – clearly there are more, but it is a bit limited, so an easy one for a quick article! Quadraplay                                 A make of tractor mounted (via the three-point linkage) frame which can have up to four types of different implements attached, including a flexible comb, a range of rakes, drag brush, spiker, slitter, lute, roller or spiked roller. The width of the frame is

It’s the Environment, Stupid!

The main focus of much industry and media commentary (which is often influenced by industry money) is on the apparent minimal direct impact on human health from the use of pesticides and from the likely low probability of causing a human health issue, especially cancer. The main weight of evidence does indicate that the contribution to such human health issues is small (in most cases) and within what most people would accept as reasonable risk: Some would disagree, and we

Moss and its control in turf

Moss: A low growing plant found in many different situations. Moss is particularly prevalent in turf surfaces that are shaded and damp, which can be typical of many lawns, as well as those that are neglected or have not had the correct type of maintenance for the lawn conditions. With there being some 600 plus species of moss in the UK, it can be found growing almost anywhere: wet or dry soil, acid or alkaline soils, compacted or more open

Weeds

You might love them, as they are wild flowers, hate them, as they can make a lawn (or sports surface) look very unsightly if present in large numbers, or just tolerate them. Weeds, what are they though? A definition An undesirable plant. Sometimes the wording ‘growing in an unwanted place’ is added to a definition, but this doesn’t really add any extra value to the meaning, because it is still undesirable at the end of the day. Weeds can be

Chafer Grub Control

Currently there is no chemical of last resort to help control chafer grubs which have exceeded the desired threshold for a particular turf surface. The threshold is a quantity above which unacceptable damage would occur and this is a subjective opinion in many cases, although there will be a figure (depending upon the species concerned) above which significant damage will be caused. It will, however, vary according to the needs of the user, manager, budget, resources available and quality of