Category Archives: Sustainability

Integrated Pest Management

Introduction Following on from a recent Tweet, I’ve had several messages asking for some commentary to explain a bit more about Integrated Pest Management( IPM). The term Integrated Pest Management (IPM) evolved over time from different terminology centred on pest management and integrated control, finally becoming accepted in 1972. The original emphasis of IPM was on insect pests and how to reduce their negative economic impact on crops, however, this term has developed to include fungi, bacteria, weeds and other organisms

Football Pitches: Quality Revisited

During my annual leave fortnight, with the World Cup in full swing, I thought a revisit of research from 30 years ago might be interesting to see how this might influence considerations of different levels of pitch quality and maintenance we encounter today. The Pitch Prototypes Project, 1986-1990, was undertaken by the STRI and University College of Wales, Aberystwyth, and was funded by the then Sports Council and the Department of Education and Science. The original research focused on what

Turf Management: Change of focus

The aim of turf management is on creating a surface which is fit for purpose. A significant effort is put into carrying out a wide range of essential maintenance activities to create the desired surface.  Sometimes we can become too absorbed into undertaking maintenance work without taking a step back and questioning how not just how effective is the work, but also what are the wider consequences of the activity on the sustainability of the turfgrass environment. Changing the focus

Intensification in Turf Management

Agricultural intensification aims to increase food production through increased resource inputs. It “… can be technically defined as an increase in agricultural production per unit of inputs (which may be labour, land, time, fertilizer, seed, feed or cash). For practical purposes, intensification occurs when there is an increase in the total volume of agricultural production that results from a higher productivity of inputs, or agricultural production is maintained while certain inputs are decreased (such as by more effective delivery of

Work with nature, not against it

A successful turf surface is one where the groundsman or greenkeeper works with nature, not against it. What I mean by this is that we must nurture nature by understanding ecological processes and the impacts maintenance activities and weather conditions have on these processes. Don’t try and force grass to grow (making it weak, more susceptible to disease and easier to wear and be kicked out of a surface) by applying an incorrect fertiliser or with a late in the year fertiliser application just