Category Archives: Lawn care

Pesticides available to amateurs

There’s been much press of late of the controversial pesticide Glyphosate with the latest findings being that it does not cause cancer in humans (Nov 9th, 2017) but according to an example Material Data Safety Sheet (of which there are many examples) published for the commercial product it is “Toxic to aquatic organisms; may cause long term adverse effects in the aquatic environment.” (as well as having  “Risk of serious damage to eyes“), so glyphosate washing into drains and polluting the watercourse

A – Z of Lawn Care

Here’s my 26 terms or words, one for each letter of the alphabet, which aim to capture the essence of lawn care, although I’m sure there are plenty of other possibilities, so not meant as definitive, just a snap shot: A – Algae A wet slimy organism, especially on damp and shady lawns. The main type found on lawns is called ‘squidge’. B – Brushing Keep your lawn groomed; this helps to knock over worm casts, keeps the grass blades upright, especially

Lawn update – December 5th

Not much activity over November and very little happening at the moment. The last cut was on 3rd November, a full month ago, and the grass height now averaged 55mm in height (it mostly ranged from 50mm-60mm) so an average growth of just 15mm over 30, or so, days. So, for this time of year we are seeing growth reduced to an average of 0.5mm per day, which with just 9 hours of light per day and combined with relatively cold

Leatherjackets in your turf – Don’t panic

With the daddy long-legs (Tipula paludosa) having laid their eggs over the summer time, the eggs will now have hatched, having then turned into larvae, and will be readily eating away at the base of grasses and grass roots. “They can be active at temperatures as low as 5°C (Blackshaw, 1992) and so can continue to feed during periods of mild weather in winter. They become more active and feed voraciously in the spring when the soil begins to warm. When fully

Work with nature, not against it

A successful turf surface is one where the groundsman or greenkeeper works with nature, not against it. What I mean by this is that we must nurture nature by understanding ecological processes and the impacts maintenance activities and weather conditions have on these processes. Don’t try and force grass to grow (making it weak, more susceptible to disease and easier to wear and be kicked out of a surface) by applying an incorrect fertiliser or with a late in the year fertiliser application just