Category Archives: Lawn care

Weeds

You might love them, as they are wild flowers, hate them, as they can make a lawn (or sports surface) look very unsightly if present in large numbers, or just tolerate them. Weeds, what are they though? A definition An undesirable plant. Sometimes the wording ‘growing in an unwanted place’ is added to a definition, but this doesn’t really add any extra value to the meaning, because it is still undesirable at the end of the day. Weeds can be

Chafer Grub Control

Currently there is no chemical of last resort to help control chafer grubs which have exceeded the desired threshold for a particular turf surface. The threshold is a quantity above which unacceptable damage would occur and this is a subjective opinion in many cases, although there will be a figure (depending upon the species concerned) above which significant damage will be caused. It will, however, vary according to the needs of the user, manager, budget, resources available and quality of

Lawn comparison – 1 year on

With the extreme weather we’ve had this year – extended dry periods and practically no rain through June and July, along with only a little in August, I thought a comparison of my lawn with what it was like exactly one year ago would be useful. The background story for this year for my lawn has been that all that has been done to it is mow at 40mm, with clippings always being boxed off; a few trimmings of the

Beyond IPM (Part 3 of 3)

Weed management Weeds that are present in a sports turf or fine ornamental lawn will generally only provide a very low health and safety risk due to reduced turf strength, potentially producing either a slippery surface or one which provides less traction (or grip) for a player. This could increase the potential for minor injuries from twists and falls, but the likelihood of injury would be very small. Moss and algae can pose a higher risk in some areas, especially

Beyond IPM (Part 2 of 3)

Much of the below is plain common sense and is practiced by many greenkeepers and groundsmen anyway, although it doesn’t hurt to reiterate some good practices with an aim to minimise and eliminate the use of pesticides. Disease management The implementation of an integrated disease management strategy that really emphasises the importance of having a good understanding of disease ecology along with correct cultural and physical practices, which are based on sound agronomic principles, can provide a solid foundation in