Category Archives: Lawn care

Lawn comparison – 1 year on

With the extreme weather we’ve had this year – extended dry periods and practically no rain through June and July, along with only a little in August, I thought a comparison of my lawn with what it was like exactly one year ago would be useful. The background story for this year for my lawn has been that all that has been done to it is mow at 40mm, with clippings always being boxed off; a few trimmings of the

Beyond IPM (Part 3 of 3)

Weed management Weeds that are present in a sports turf or fine ornamental lawn will generally only provide a very low health and safety risk due to reduced turf strength, potentially producing either a slippery surface or one which provides less traction (or grip) for a player. This could increase the potential for minor injuries from twists and falls, but the likelihood of injury would be very small. Moss and algae can pose a higher risk in some areas, especially

Beyond IPM (Part 2 of 3)

Much of the below is plain common sense and is practiced by many greenkeepers and groundsmen anyway, although it doesn’t hurt to reiterate some good practices with an aim to minimise and eliminate the use of pesticides. Disease management The implementation of an integrated disease management strategy that really emphasises the importance of having a good understanding of disease ecology along with correct cultural and physical practices, which are based on sound agronomic principles, can provide a solid foundation in

Beyond IPM (Part 1 of 3)

With the findings of the recent court case (August 2018) in the USA regarding the use of the pesticide Glyphosate and its alleged contribution to the cancer of a groundsman, as well as the negative impact pesticide use has on wildlife in general, the need to challenge Integrated Pest Management (IPM) as supposedly being the ‘best practice’ approach cannot be understated and is part of a wider an issue we should be investigating and debating. (The Guardian, 11th August 2018,

Integrated Pest Management

Introduction Following on from a recent Tweet, I’ve had several messages asking for some commentary to explain a bit more about Integrated Pest Management( IPM). The term Integrated Pest Management (IPM) evolved over time from different terminology centred on pest management and integrated control, finally becoming accepted in 1972. The original emphasis of IPM was on insect pests and how to reduce their negative economic impact on crops, however, this term has developed to include fungi, bacteria, weeds and other organisms