Author Archives: ChrisG63

Carbon Footprinting and Climate Change

Just a quick reflection on a recent event: With the meeting of the IPCC (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change) in South Korea on 8th October 2018, the summary statement was  that “Limiting global warming to 1.5°C would require rapid, far-reaching and unprecedented changes in all aspects of society, …….. With clear benefits to people and natural ecosystems, limiting global warming to 1.5°C compared to 2°C could go hand in hand with ensuring a more sustainable and equitable society, …..” I

Assessment for long-term learning and recall

This is an interesting one in which there are plenty of different opinions and theories on the most appropriate way to assess learners. Building a knowledge base is essential if an individual is to learn effectively. The process of learning and then assessment of that learning, formatively and summatively including providing  appropriate learner feedback, will demonstrate how effective the inputs have been to achieve the desired outcome of long-term learning and memory recall. Daisy Christodoulou presents a persuasive case in

Lawn comparison – 1 year on

With the extreme weather we’ve had this year – extended dry periods and practically no rain through June and July, along with only a little in August, I thought a comparison of my lawn with what it was like exactly one year ago would be useful. The background story for this year for my lawn has been that all that has been done to it is mow at 40mm, with clippings always being boxed off; a few trimmings of the

Beyond IPM (Part 3 of 3)

Weed management Weeds that are present in a sports turf or fine ornamental lawn will generally only provide a very low health and safety risk due to reduced turf strength, potentially producing either a slippery surface or one which provides less traction (or grip) for a player. This could increase the potential for minor injuries from twists and falls, but the likelihood of injury would be very small. Moss and algae can pose a higher risk in some areas, especially

Beyond IPM (Part 2 of 3)

Much of the below is plain common sense and is practiced by many greenkeepers and groundsmen anyway, although it doesn’t hurt to reiterate some good practices with an aim to minimise and eliminate the use of pesticides. Disease management The implementation of an integrated disease management strategy that really emphasises the importance of having a good understanding of disease ecology along with correct cultural and physical practices, which are based on sound agronomic principles, can provide a solid foundation in